Quantcast Profile Experiments

Quantcast Profile Experiments

Engagement Experiments

Our goal on the Growth team is to maintain and grow the Quantcast Measure self-serve customer base, and to get them on the path to be a paying customer. In order to do that, we need to make sure that customers see the value of the profile and understand how it can help their business.

We run experiments to increase user engagement, interaction with new features, improvement of liked features, and improve the onboarding process.

Demographics Card Update

In this particular experiment, our goal was to increase engagement on the Quantcast Measure profile. It is a scrolling page consisting of 10 cards which contain a different report on your website/app. We use bar charts on 5 out of the 10 cards.

Our hypothesis in this experiment is if we diversify and simplify the ways we visualize data, people won't skim as quickly, creating a focus on the card buttons and data. For us, engagement is: staying on the card longer, clicking on “View Details.” and/or changing the data view on the side (Composition, Web/Apps, Help).

We targeted the Demographics card because it is close to the top, and has more visibility.

Current Demographics card.

I identified elements in the current design I liked and wanted to improve upon. I also needed to make decisions on how different I could go since it still needs to fit in with the other cards.

  • Data labels are right aligned with the graph right next to it, making the data easy to quickly scan.
  • The other elements seem unanchored and chart labels look off to me.
  • The bars don't show true “100%”.
  • Our research shows users don't interact with the options on the side, so maybe surfacing Composition instead of Index might clue the user that more data is available.
  • Design A.

    Design A. I played around with how the charts were sorted, putting them all one on top of each other so it was easier to align elements. It's easier to find what you need, but a bit harder to scan. I received feedback that it's harder to compare the data and that the card is getting too long.

    Design B.

    Design B. This design received more positive feedback. The team liked how compact and easy to read it was.

    Proposed Demographics card.

    The design we landed on also features the U.S. Composition, something you usually only see in the Details view. The height of this card is determined by the height of the Index view, so I couldn't make it as short as I wanted to. I am hoping the focus is still on the the data, the “View Details” button, and the switches on the right side.

    UI Button Prompts

    Experiment on the Buzzfeed Profile page

    An experiment to test the waters on simple visual cues to teach users how to interact with Profile cards. Our hypothesis is that they don't see the “View Details” button and clicking on the button will give the users more value.


    Growth Experiment

    2017

    • Product
    • Experiment
    • UI/UX
    • Sketch

    Growth Experiment

    2017

    • Product
    • Experiment
    • UI/UX
    • Sketch

    Demographics Card Update

    In this particular experiment, our goal was to increase engagement on the Quantcast Measure profile. It is a scrolling page consisting of 10 cards which contain a different report on your website/app. We use bar charts on 5 out of the 10 cards.

    Our hypothesis in this experiment is if we diversify and simplify the ways we visualize data, people won't skim as quickly, creating a focus on the card buttons and data. For us, engagement is: staying on the card longer, clicking on “View Details.” and/or changing the data view on the side (Composition, Web/Apps, Help).

    We targeted the Demographics card because it is close to the top, and has more visibility.

    Current Demographics card.

    I identified elements in the current design I liked and wanted to improve upon. I also needed to make decisions on how different I could go since it still needs to fit in with the other cards.

  • Data labels are right aligned with the graph right next to it, making the data easy to quickly scan.
  • The other elements seem unanchored and chart labels look off to me.
  • The bars don't show true “100%”.
  • Our research shows users don't interact with the options on the side, so maybe surfacing Composition instead of Index might clue the user that more data is available.
  • Design A.

    Design A. I played around with how the charts were sorted, putting them all one on top of each other so it was easier to align elements. It's easier to find what you need, but a bit harder to scan. I received feedback that it's harder to compare the data and that the card is getting too long.

    Design B.

    Design B. This design received more positive feedback. The team liked how compact and easy to read it was.

    Proposed Demographics card.

    The design we landed on also features the U.S. Composition, something you usually only see in the Details view. The height of this card is determined by the height of the Index view, so I couldn't make it as short as I wanted to. I am hoping the focus is still on the the data, the “View Details” button, and the switches on the right side.

    UI Button Prompts

    Experiment on the Buzzfeed Profile page

    An experiment to test the waters on simple visual cues to teach users how to interact with Profile cards. Our hypothesis is that they don't see the “View Details” button and clicking on the button will give the users more value.


    Other Quantcast Projects

    Measure Monthly Report

    Quantcast Blog Posts

    Quantcast Chrome Extension

    Back to all projects